Why do we work? Saints and Scripture Sunday

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Saints and Scripture Sunday

Colossians 3:23-24

Whatever you do, do your work heartily, as for the Lord rather than men,

knowing that from the Lord you will receive the reward of the inheritance.

It is the Lord Christ whom you serve.

Getting back to my list of Catholic social teachings, the option for the poor and vulnerable is up next. I discussed that topic a few weeks ago, but it came back to my mind again this weekend, as some of our town’s local churches collected for a food bank.  As I went through my pantry, I gave thanks that in my world, going hungry is not something I generally worry about.

The next topic on our tenets of Catholic social teaching discusses the dignity of work, and the rights of all workers. Once again, I give thanks that I have a secure job, that doesn’t take me that far away from my family.

According to the USCCB

In a marketplace where too often the quarterly bottom line takes precedence over the rights of workers, we believe that the economy must serve people, not the other way around. Work is more than a way to make a living; it is a form of continuing participation in God’s creation. If the dignity of work is to be protected, then the basic rights of workers must be respected—the right to productive work, to decent and fair wages, to organize and join unions, to private property, and to economic initiative. Respecting these rights promotes an economy that protects human life, defends human rights, and advances the well-being of all.

Let’s continue to give thanks for the jobs that we have, and pray for others to find jobs soon. This scripture written by Paul reminds me to be an example of Christ in my workplace as well.

For me, I look to St Joseph as the prime example of a hard worker. Poor, humble, and obedient to God, he provided for his family, and taught Jesus in his carpenter’s trade.

For those searching for jobs, or at a crossroads in a career, this prayer to St Joseph may be helpful.

Prayer to Saint Joseph, Patron of Workers

Glorious Saint Joseph, you are the pattern of all who work. Obtain for me, please, the grace to work conscientiously and to put devotion to duty before my selfish inclinations. Help me to labor in thankfulness and joy, for it is an honor to employ and to develop by my labor the gifts I have received from almighty God. Grant that I may work in orderliness, peace, moderation and patience without shrinking from weariness and difficulties. I offer my fatigue and perplexities as reparation for sin. I shall work, above all, with a pure intention and with detachment from self, having always before my eyes the hour of death and the accounting which I must then render of time ill-spent, of talents unemployed, of good undone, and of empty pride in success, which is so fatal to the work of God. For Jesus through Mary, all in imitation of you, good Saint Joseph. This shall be my motto in life and in death. Amen.

I’ll be wrapping up my series on Catholic social teachings soon, and then I’m planning on moving in a slightly different direction here. I’m in the process of interviewing priests, deacons, sisters, music ministers, children’s formation directors, pro-life advocates and more. When the interview is complete, I’ll be sharing the information here on Saints and Scripture Sunday.

If you have any questions you’ve pondered, for a person within our Church, leave me a comment, shoot me an email, or use my contact form tab above. I’d love to hear what you want to know, too.

Join up, and have a marvelous week!

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Comments

  1. What great example with St Joseph!

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